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Masculine/Masculine
The Male Nude in Art from 1800 to the Present Day

Masculine / Masculine: The Male Nude in Art from 1800 to the Present Day
  • Masculine / Masculine: The Male Nude in Art from 1800 to the Present Day
  • Masculine / Masculine: The Male Nude in Art from 1800 to the Present Day
  • Masculine / Masculine: The Male Nude in Art from 1800 to the Present Day
  • Masculine / Masculine: The Male Nude in Art from 1800 to the Present Day
  • Masculine / Masculine: The Male Nude in Art from 1800 to the Present Day
  • Masculine / Masculine: The Male Nude in Art from 1800 to the Present Day

Rodin’s Thinker. Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man. Pigalle’s controversial portrayal of the philosopher Voltaire. From its earliest days, art history has been rife with representations of nude men. But while there are many studies of art celebrating the female form, the male nude has suffered from relative neglect. It is highly significant that until the show at the Leopold Museum in Vienna in the autumn of 2012, no exhibition had opted to take a fresh approach, over a long historical perspective, to the representation of the male nude. However, male nudity was for a long time, from the 17th to 19th centuries, the basis of traditional Academic art training and a key element in Western creative art.

Today, the nude essentially brings to mind a female body, the legacy of a 19th century that established it as an absolute and as the accepted object of male desire. Prior to this, however, the female body was regarded less favourably than its more structured, more muscular male counterpart. Since the Renaissance, the male nude had been accorded more importance: the man as a universal being became a synonym for Mankind, and his body was established as the ideal human form, as was already the case in Greco-Roman art. Examples of this interpretation abound in the Judeo-Christian cultural heritage: Adam existed before Eve, who was no more than his copy and the origin of sin. Most artists being male, they found an “ideal me” in the male nude, a magnified, narcissistic reflection of themselves. And yet, until the middle of the 20th century, the sexual organ was the source of a certain embarrassment, whether shrunken or well hidden beneath strategically placed drapery, thong or scabbard.

Masculine/Masculine runs at the Musée d'Orsay, Paris, from 24 September 2013 until 2 January 2014.

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